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chapter_24.2_japan_tradition_and_change

Chapter 24.2 Japan: Tradition and Change

Objectives

  1. Learn about the growth of Japan's economy.
  2. Find out about successes and challenges in Japan's economy.
  3. Examine aspects of life in Japan.
  4. Compare information to identify similarities.

Building a Developed Economy

Guided Instruction

  1. Cloze Read: Building a Developed Economy (pp. 720-21)

Guided Practice

Rally Swap: Building a Developed Economy

Word Document

Circulate around the room as students work to provide correction and guidance as needed.

  1. Describe how both the United States and Japan were involved in the recovery of the Japanese economy after World War 2. The United States helped rebuild Japan's industries, and the Japanese government helped industries by giving them subsidies.
  2. What are some high-technology products made in Japan? Possible answers: televisions, media players, gaming systems, etc.

Independent Practice

Concept Map: Tradition and Change

Word Document

Circulate around the room as students work to provide correction and guidance as needed.

Using the concept map template, write “Tradition and Change” in the middle and start adding information you have learned from pp. 720-21.

Successes and Challenges

Guided Instruction

  1. Rally Read: Successes and Challenges (p. 722)

Guided Practice

Rally Swap: Successes and Challenges

Word Document

Circulate around the room as students work to provide correction and guidance as needed.

  1. Describe Japan's economy in the 1980s. Japan had one of the world's strongest and largest economies; it depended on exporting products to the rest of the world.
  2. How did Japanese spending habits contribute to poor trade relations between Japan and other countries? The Japanese people did not buy many imported goods. This led some countries to grow frustrated because although they bought Japanese products, Japan did not buy their products.

Independent Practice

Concept Map: Tradition and Change

Word Document

Circulate around the room as students work to provide correction and guidance as needed.

Continue working on your concept map by adding information you've learned from p. 722.

Country Profile: Focus on Geography

Guided Instruction

  1. Rally Read: Country Profile: Focus on Geography (p. 723)

Guided Practice

  1. What three types of land use are shown on the map? Urban areas, forestry, and commercial farming.
  2. What is being measured in the comparison between Montana, California, Massachusetts, and Japan? The chart compares population density.
  3. What sources are used to compare the land use of Japan and Massachusetts? The Japan National Land Agency and the U.S. Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Independent Practice

Map and Chart Skills

Have the students work with their team to answer the three questions on p. 723 and be prepared to share verbally with the class.

  1. What percentages of Japan's land are devoted to agriculture and forest? 13.6% is devoted to agriculture and 70.7% is devoted to forest.
  2. Does Japan devote more or less land to agriculture and forest than Massachusetts? Japan devotes more than Massachusetts,
  3. What explains this difference? Japan preserves large areas of forest and farmland because most of its population is crowded into smaller urban areas.

Life in Japan

Guided Instruction

  1. Rally Read: Life in Japan (pp. 724-25)

Guided Practice

Rally Swap: Life in Japan

Word Document

Circulate around the room as students work to provide correction and guidance as needed.

  1. What is keiretsu? It is a Japanese term for a group of companies that join together to work toward one another's success.
  2. How does keiretsu reflect the traditions of Japan? Working together as a group is a Japanese tradition.
  3. How has the role of women in the Japanese work force changed since World War II? Before the war, few women in Japan worked outside the home. Today, more women work full or part time than those who stay at home fill time, and half of Japan's work force is made up of women.
  4. What are some challenges facing Japan's labor force? Japan has an aging population, a low birth rate, and has had limited immigration in the past. These factors contribute to a current shortage of younger workers.
  5. Study the picture on p. 725. What purpose do you think school uniforms serve? They ensure that everyone is dressed appropriately for school and prevent competition between students.

Independent Practice

Concept Map: Tradition and Change

Word Document

Circulate around the room as students work to provide correction and guidance as needed.

Finish working on your concept map by adding information you've learned from pp. 723-25.

Assessment

Chapter 24.2 Open Book Quiz

  1. What are two ways in which tradition and change have helped Japan build its economy?
  2. Describe what Japan's economy was life by the 1920s.
  3. Tell how Japan's economy grew from the 1960s to the 1980s.
  4. What happened that disturbed Japan's economy in the early 1990s? How did this affect Japan?
  5. What tradition helps explain why Japanese companies formed keiretsu?
  6. What is one resource a country needs to produce goods and services?
  7. How would a low birthrate affect a country's labor force?
chapter_24.2_japan_tradition_and_change.txt · Last modified: 2018/05/20 23:49 by john